Conversion to Islam
Conversion to Islam, whether on a mass or individual basis, was a common phenomenon in Ottoman Crete. A simple declaration of faith made in the presence of a Muslim magistrate was all that was required of converts. Members of the same family were often adherents of different faiths, since conversion of one parent to Islam did not necessarily extend to children and vice-versa. Nevertheless, marriages were dissolved if only one spouse converted.

Mass conversions involving entire villages and in some cases even the priest were also common. The decision to change religion was usually made on an individual basis for personal gain, and was not the result of coercion.

Islamized Christians were known as Turco-Cretans; sources depict them as being even more fundamentalist on religious matters than Muslims by descent, though at the same time they were greatly attached to their native island.

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A Cretan Muslim in contemporary attire
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